St. Mark Of Ephesus
St. Marks Welcomes You

Our mission has been in witness to Christ since 1983


Parish Priest: Father James Robinson

Church phone: (781) 585-8907
Father James:   (339) 204-3074  (paisius1@verizon.net)


Liturgy:  Sunday mornings  10:00 am  (followed by coffee hour)
 

Vespers:   first Saturday of the month 6:00 PM

 Vespers - July

moved from July 4th to Saturday July 11th

 

Many interesting Saints/Feasts listed below - check them out!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Highlighted Feast - Holy Transfiguration (August 6)

 

The Holy Transfiguration of our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ is one of the twelve great Feasts in the Orthodox Church and is celebrated this year on August 6th.  

It demonstrates the Divinity of Christ as Jesus' appearance is transformed on Mt. Tabor in front of three of His disciples.  It can be a good time for us to reflect on how we can transfigure or change our lives to be more spiritual.

 

 

The following is from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America 

  

 

INTRODUCTION

The Feast of the Transfiguration of Our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ is celebrated each year on August 6. The feast commemorates the transfiguration or metamorphosis of Christ on Mount Tabor, when our Lord appeared in His divine glory before the Apostles Peter, James, and John.

 

BIBLICAL STORY

The event of the Transfiguration is recorded in three of the four Gospels:Matthew 17:1-9Mark 9:2-8, and Luke 9:28-36. Jesus took the Apostles Peter, James, and John with Him up upon a mountain, and while they were on the mountain Jesus was transfigured. His face shone like the sun, and His garments became glistening white.

Moses and Elijah appeared with Christ, talking to Him. Peter declared how good it was for them to be there and expressed the desire to build three booths for Moses, Elijah, and Christ. This reference to the booths could imply that this occurred during the time of the Feast of Tabernacles when the Jews would be camping out in the fields for the grape harvest; for this Feast had acquired other associations in the course of its history, including the memory of the wanderings in the wilderness recorded in the Old Testament book of Exodus.

While Peter was speaking, a bright cloud overshadowed them. A voice came from the cloud saying, "This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to Him." When the disciples heard this they fell on their faces filled with awe. Jesus came to them and told them to not be afraid. When the three looked up they saw only Jesus.

As Jesus and His disciples came down the mountain, He told them not to speak of what they had seen until He had risen from the dead.

 

ICON OF THE FEAST

In the icon of the Feast of the Transfiguration, Christ is the central figure (1.), appearing in a dominant position within a circular mandorla. He is clearly at the visual and theological center of the icon. His right hand is raised in blessing, and his left hand contains a scroll. The mandorla with its brilliant colors of white, gold, and blue represent the divine glory and light. The halo around the head of Christ is inscribed with the Greek words O on, meaning "The One Who is".

1. Christ appears in the center of the icon blessing with His right hand
and dressed in bright white robes (detail).

Elijah (2.) and Moses (3.) stand at the top of separate mountain peaks to the left and right of Christ. They are bowing toward Christ with their right hands raised in a gesture of intercession towards Him. Saint John Chrysostom explains the presence of these two fathers of the faith from the Old Testament in three ways. He states that they represent the Law and the Prophets (Moses received the Law from God, and Elijah was a great prophet); they both experienced visions of God (Moses on Mount Sinai and Elijah on Mount Carmel); and they represent the living and the dead (Elijah, the living, because he was taken up into heaven by a chariot of fire, and Moses, the dead, because he did experience death).

 

2. The Prophet Elijah, appears on Christ's right-hand side (detail).
3. Moses, who is seen holding the Ten Commandments, appears on Christ's left-hand side (detail).

Below Christ are the three Apostles, who by their posture in the icon show their response to the transfiguration of Christ (4.). James has fallen over backwards with his hands over his eyes. John in the center has fallen prostrate. Peter is kneeling and raises his right hand toward Christ in a gesture expressing his desire to build the three booths. The garments of the Apostles are in a state of disarray as to indicate the dramatic impact the vision has had on them.

 

4. The three Apostles who accompanied Christ to the moutain, Peter, John, and James, react to the vision of Christ's Transfiguration.

 

5. The garments of the Apostles are in state of disarray (detail). 6. The Apostle James reacts to the vision by falling to the ground and attempting to cover his eyes (detail).

The icon of the feast directs our attention toward the event of the Transfiguration and specifically to the glory of God as revealed in Christ. This event came at a critical point in the ministry of our Lord, just as He was setting out on His journey to Jerusalem. He would soon experience the humiliation, suffering, and death of the Cross. However, the glorious light of the Resurrection was revealed to strengthen His disciples for the trials that they would soon experience.

The feast also points to the great and glorious Second Coming of our Lord and the fulfillment of the Kingdom of God when all of creation will be transfigured and filled with light.

 

The following is the OCA description:

 The Transfiguration of Christ is one of the central events recorded in the gospels. Immediately after the Lord was recognized by his apostles as “the Christ [Messiah], the Son of the Living God,” he told them that “he must go up to Jerusalem and suffer many things ... and be killed and on the third day be raised” (Mt 16). The announcement of Christ’s approaching passion and death was met with indignation by the disciples. And then, after rebuking them, the Lord took Peter, James, and John “up to a high mountain”—by tradition Mount Tabor—and was “transfigured before them.”

... and his face shone like the sun, and his garments became white as snow and behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. And Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is well that we are here; if you wish I will make three booths here, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” He was still speaking when lo, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my Beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.” When the disciples heard this, they fell on their faces with awe. But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Rise, and have no fear.” And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one but Jesus only. And as they were coming down the mountain, Jesus commanded them, “Tell no one the vision, until the Son of Man is raised from the dead” (Mt 17:1-92, see also Mk 9:1-9; Lk 9:28-36; 2 Peter 1:16-18).

The Jewish Festival of Booths was a feast of the dwelling of God with men, and the transfiguration of Christ reveals how this dwelling takes place in and through the Messiah, the Son of God in human flesh. There is little doubt that Christ’s transfiguration took place at the time of the Festival of Booths, and that the celebration of the event in the Christian Church became the New Testamental fulfillment of the Old Testamental feast in a way similar to the feasts of Passover and Pentecost

In the Transfiguration, the apostles see the glory of the Kingdom of God present in majesty in the person of Christ. They see that in him, indeed, all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell,” that “in him the whole fulness of deity dwells bodily” (Col 1:19, 2:9). They see this before the crucifixion so that in the resurrection they might know who it is who has suffered for them, and what it is that this one, who is God, has prepared for those who love him. This is what the Church celebrates in the feast of the Transfiguration.

Thou wast transfigured on the mount. O Christ God, revealing Thy glory to Thy disciples as they could bear it. Let Thine everlasting light shine upon us sinners. Through the prayers of the Theotokos, O Giver of Light, glory to Thee (Troparion).

On the mountain wast Thou transfigured, O Christ God, and Thy disciples beheld Thy glory as far as they could see it; so that when they would behold Thee crucified, they would understand that Thy suffering was voluntary, and would proclaim to the world that Thou art truly the Radiance of the Father (Kontakion).

Besides the fundamental meaning which the event of the Transfiguration has in the context of the life and mission of Christ, and in addition to the theme of the glory of God which is revealed in all of its divine splendor in the face of the Saviour, the presence of Moses and Elijah is also of great significance for the understanding and celebration of the feast. Many of the hymns refer to these two leading figures of the Old Covenant as do the three scripture readings of Vespers which tell of the manifestation of the glory of God to these holy men of old (Ex 24:12-18; 33:11-34:8; 1 Kings 19:3-16).

Moses and Elijah, according to the liturgical verses, are not only the greatest figures of the Old Testament who now come to worship the Son of God in glory, they also are not merely two of the holy men to whom God has revealed himself in the prefigurative theophanies of the Old Covenant of Israel. These two figures actually stand for the Old Testament itself: Moses for the Law and Elijah for the Prophets. And Christ is the fulfillment of the Law and the Prophets (Mt 5:17).

They also stand for the living and dead, for Moses died and his burial place is known, while Elijah was taken alive into heaven in order to appear again to announce the time of God’s salvation in Christ the Messiah. Thus, in appearing with Jesus on the mount of Transfiguration, Moses and Elijah show that the Messiah Saviour is here, and that he is the Son of God to whom the Father himself bears witness, the Lord of all creation, of the Old and New Testaments, of the living and the dead. The Transfiguration of Christ in itself is the fulfillment of all of the theophanies and manifestations of God, a fulfillment made perfect and complete in the person of Christ. The Transfiguration of Christ reveals to us our ultimate destiny as Christians, the ultimate destiny of all men and all creation to be transformed and glorified by the majestic splendor of God himself.

There is little doubt that the feast of the Transfiguration of Christ belonged first to the preÄEaster season of the Church. It was perhaps celebrated on one of the Sundays of Lent, for besides certain historical evidence and the fact that today Saint Gregory Palamas, the great teacher of the Transfiguration of Christ, is commemorated during Lent, the event itself is one which is definitely connected with the approaching death and resurrection of the Saviour.

... for when they would behold Thee crucified, they would understand that Thy suffering was voluntary (Kontakion).

The feast of the Transfiguration is presently celebrated on the sixth of August, probably for some historical reason. The summer celebration of the feast, however, has lent itself very well to the theme of transfiguration. The blessing of grapes, as well as other fruits and vegetables on this day is the most beautiful and adequate sign of the final transfiguration of all things in Christ. It signifies the ultimate flowering and fruitfulness of all creation in the paradise of God’s unending Kingdom of Life where all will he transformed by the glory of the Lord.

 

Troparion — Tone 7

You were transfigured on the mountain, O Christ God, / revealing Your glory to Your disciples as far as they could bear it. / Let Your everlasting Light also shine upon us sinners, / through the prayers of the Theotokos. / O Giver of Light, glory to You!

 

Kontakion — Tone 7

On the Mountain You were Transfigured, O Christ God, / And Your disciples beheld Your glory as far as they could see it; / So that when they would behold You crucified, / They would understand that Your suffering was voluntary, / And would proclaim to the world, / That You are truly the Radiance of the Father!

 

 

OCA Youth Camp

 
Fr. John Hopko (Director of Youth Rally) would like all parishes to be informed of Youth Rally 2015 dates-see flyer attached.  (For kids ages 10-17)
He is also now recruiting volunteer adult staff members.  Adult Staff Members need to be active Orthodox Christian communicants of at least 18 years old who have the blessing of their parish priest (i.e. the priest who regularly hears their confession) to participate and who have been approved as staff by Fr. John Hopko.

Christ is Risen!   Laura

  
Here are the details concerning this year’s Youth Rally: New England Diocesan Youth Rally 2015
 
When: August 10-15, 2015 (Rally Staff arrives the evening before Rally begins, on Sunday evening, August 9)
  
Who: All diocesan youth who have completed fifth grade and have not yet celebrated their 18th birthday are eligible to attend Youth Rally, (together with adults who are interested in and eligible to serve as leaders!)
 
Where: At the Campgrounds of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Boston’s Saint Methodios Faith and Heritage Center, Contoocook, New Hampshire, (the same place as last year!)
 
For further information and to request registration materials, please call or email Fr. John Hopko, Youth Rally Director, at phone number (860) 582-3631, or email address saintcyril@snet.net
 
NOTE:   The FIRM deadline for youth registration is July 6, 2015 (Potential Staff Members should contact Fr. John right away!)
We can’t wait to see you at Youth Rally this year!
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Adult Staff Members (Volunteers)
 
Adult Staff Members need to be active Orthodox Christian communicants of at least 18 years old who have the blessing of their parish priest (i.e, the priest who regularly hears their confession) to participate and who have been approved as staff by Fr. John Hopko, Rally Director, on behalf of the Diocese of New England.
 
 
 
 
Saints and Feasts for the Month

click on the words to the right of the Saint or Feast to learn more - now this opens a new windowso you don't have to hit "Back"

  
 
July 1       Holy Wonderworking Unmercenary Physicians Cosmas and Damian at Rome     info here
 
July 4       Saint Andrew the Archbishop of Crete     info here
 
July 8       Icon of the Mother of God “Our Lady of Sitka”     info here
 
July 10     Venerable Anthony of the Kiev Far Caves, Founder of Monasticism in Russia     info here
 
July 15     Equal of the Apostles Great Prince Vladimir, in Holy Baptism Basil, the Enlightener of the Russian Land     info here
 
July 18     Martyr Emilian of Silistria in Bulgaria     info here
 
July 20     Holy, Glorious Prophet Elijah     info here
 
July 21     Prophet Ezekiel     info here
 
July 22     Myrrhbearer and Equal of the Apostles Mary Magdalene     info here
 
July 24     Martyrs and Passion-Bearers Boris and Gleb     info here
                Martyr and Passion-Bearer Gleb, in Holy Baptism David     more info here on Gleb
 
July 25     Dormition of the Righteous Anna, the Mother of the Most Holy Theotokos     info here
 
July 27     Greatmartyr and Healer Panteleimon     info here
 
August 1   Procession of the Honorable Wood of the Life-Giving Cross of the Lord     info here
 
August 6   The Holy Transfiguration of our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ     info here
 
 
 
 

 
 
              
Peace Garden

Please come and enjoy our Peace Garden behind the church - stop by and relax and pray

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diocesan Newsletter

 
If you would like to receive an electronic copy of the Diocese newsletter, email Father Joshua Mosher, editor at
                                                   
 
 Current copy can be found here:      http://www.dneoca.org/files/ONE/2015/2015-03-ONE.pdf
 
 
 

 

Father Antoni is now officially attached to Saint Mark of Ephesus parish

GORI, Rev. Anthony, in his retirement, is attached to St. Mark of Ephesus Mission,Kingston, MA, effective May 12, 2014. (Diocese of New England)
 
 

 

Axios!

Our elected Council is as follows for 2015:

President:   Laura Geigle

Treasurer:   Subdn. Gregory Arnold

Reporting Secretary:   Jen Paulin

At-Large:    George Haddad

At-Large:    Subdn. Peter Condrick

At-Large:    Maria Mojica

At-Large:    Ramon Mojica

Also elected at the annual meeting were co-presidents of the Women's Group:  Nancy Haddad & Cookie Bakas

John Wozniak & John Rusinak will continue on the Finance Committee

as well as Anna Wozniak as our auditor

Lisa Shortes has agreed to start up a Teen/Young Adult group

Catherine Condrick will take over the bookstore managing.  She has rearranged the kiosk area already and will be using the bottom half of the bookshelf in that area as a lending library.

 

Saint Mark of Ephesus parish cookbook available!

St. Mark's Cookbook is on sale!  Over 200 of our favorite recipes in an easy-to-read format!
 
Contact Women's Group Co-Presidents Cookie Bakas or Nancy Haddad
 
$15 cash or check made payable to: "St. Mark's Women's Group"

ministries

St. Mark’s Ministries  2015

If you are interested in serving the church, please contact the names listed below:

Clergy: Major Orders:

Pastor: Fr. James Ransford Robinson

Fr. John T. Bacon, retired Archpriest, attached to St. Marks

Fr. R. Antony Gori, retired, attached to Chelsea church

Fr. Vasily Gilbert, attached to Holy Annunciation, Maynard

Fr. John Bernardi, attached to St. Marks, resides in Arizona

Protodeacon Nicholas Drobot, attached to Norwich, CT, ROCOR

 

Minor Orders:

Subdeacon Gregory (Douglas) Arnold

Subdeacon Shell Shortes

Subdeacon Peter Condrick

Subdn. Nicholas Vantangoli

Reader Daniel Bacon (Diocesan Council Member)

 

Acolytes:

Lawrence Reardon, Evan Shortes, Nicholas Haddad, Simon Margitich, Peter Rusniak, Nicholas Williams, George Williams

 

Parish Council:

President: Laura Geigle

Treasurer: Subdn. Gregory Arnold

Secretary: Jen Paulin

At Large: George Haddad

At Large: Subdn. Peter Condrick

At Large: Maria Mojica

At Large: Ramon Mojica

 

Finance Committee:     John Wozniak        John Rusinak

Auditor:     Anna Wozniak

Choir Director: Gina Margitich (please speak to Gina about joining the choir)

Substitute Directors: Lisa Shortes, Laura Geigle, Susan Homyk (summers)

Church School Director: Jen Paulin       Assistant: Julie Sutton

Teen Group Committee Chair: Lisa Shortes

Women’s Group Co- Presidents: Cookie Bakas & Nancy Haddad       Secretary: Nancy Haddad          Treasurer: Diana Masood

Webmaster: George Sowpel

Bookstore Manager & Lending Library: Catherine Condrick

Sacristan/Mower: Mark Margitich & Simon Margitich

Vestment Care: Maria Mojica

Food Pantry Box- Subdn. Gregory & Elaine Arnold

Church Cleaners

January - Margitich
February - OPEN!
March - Haddad
April - ALL (Pascha month!)
May - Laferte
June - Arnold
July - Corey K.
August - Geigle
September - Condrick
October - Shortes
November - Zotos
December - Vantangoli

Coffee Hour Hosts - Rusinak   Geigle   Vantangoli   Mojica   Robinson   Haddad   Arnold   Shortes   Kwong   Masood

 

Please send any comments or suggestions for the website to George Sowpel at orthodox@comcast.net


Resources to check out...

excellent short film on prayer - be sure to watch part two...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnlXsWoE_Zw&feature=share


view a wonderful video featuring our Church click here

An interesting and informative article on church eitiquette can be found here:http://www.theologic.com/oflweb/inchurch/etiquet.htm

Interesting video from Serbia - Christos Voskrese song     click here

Please look at the MINISTRIES tab on the right for ways to get involved!

A wonderful link to a good basic primer/dictionary on Orthodoxy is:  http://www.stots.edu/these_truths_we_hold.html

A good online Bible with commentary approved by the Orthodox Church is at http://orthodoxstudybible.com/




Church Cleaning List


January
- Margitich                   
February -               March - Haddads
April - ALL (Pacha month!)       May - Laferte           June - Subdeacon Gregory and Elaine

July - Corey K.                          August - Laura        September - Subdeacon Peter and Catherine     

October -  Lisa Shortes            November - Nancy Zotos         December - Vantangolis 

 

IF YOU NEED A KEY TO GET INTO THE CHURCH, SEE LAURA GEIGLE
 

 


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